Leadership Training Academy

2015 LTA DCcrop

The application period for the Class of 2016 has closed. The Class of 2017 application will be posted in spring of 2016.

Purpose of the Academy

The Physicians for Reproductive Health Leadership Training Academy prepares physicians to become lifelong leaders in reproductive health advocacy. Through an intensive program, the Academy helps its Fellows develop and internalize the skills and attributes they need to be powerful, effective advocates for comprehensive reproductive and sexual health care.

Drs. Floyd and MorrellAcademy Highlights

  • Firsthand advocacy experience
  • Visits with lawmakers in state capitals and Washington, DC
  • In-person sessions and webinars
  • Opportunities to improve medical education and share best practices in reproductive and sexual health care with peers
  • On-camera media trainings
  • Chances to educate the public about contraception, abortion, STIs, and other aspects of sexual and reproductive health
  • Collaboration with physicians around the country and across specialties
  • Opportunities to build and strengthen coalitions between organizations
  • Guidance from experts in medicine, advocacy, leadership, and communications

Who Can Apply

The Leadership Training Academy is open to physicians in any specialty and at various points in their careers. Medical specialties of past fellows include obstetrics/gynecology, family medicine, pediatrics, maternal-fetal medicine, internal medicine, and psychiatry, among others. The Academy is open to:

  • Physicians entering the final year of the Fellowship in Family Planning (FPF), the TEACH Leadership Fellowship or RHAP Reproductive Health Care and Advocacy Fellowship, FPF alumni, or Directors of Ryan Residency Programs. The Academy program, including travel and lodging expenses, is available at no cost to current participants of the Fellowship in Family Planning, TEACH or RHAP fellowships, FPF alumni, and Ryan Residency directors through funds from a categorical grant.
  • Practicing physicians in any specialty, with priority considered for those who practice in least-access states, who are able to cover their own travel and lodging expenses. These physicians are required to pay a $500 registration fee, which includes training materials and most meals.

Note: Scholarship funds may be available to cover the expenses of one or more applicants.

In addition to meeting the requirements above, applicants should have already demonstrated great potential as leaders and worked to improve reproductive and sexual health care. Further, applicants should be ready, willing, and able to be confident, visible, and tenacious ambassadors for reproductive and sexual health.

Space in the Leadership Training Academy is limited. The program runs annually from October through June.

Mission

DSC_5555Physicians for Reproductive Health founded the Leadership Training Academy to foster future generations of self-driven physician leaders who will work throughout their careers to defend and advance comprehensive reproductive and sexual health care.

 

History

Physicians for Reproductive Health has been helping doctors become physician-advocates since its inception in 1992. Formalized in 2003, our leadership training program has graduated nine classes of doctors equipped to advance reproductive and sexual health care in their home institutions and beyond.

Questions

If you have questions about the Leadership Training Academy, please contact:

Libby Benedict
Director of Leadership Training Networks
Physicians for Reproductive Health
55 W. 39th Street, 10th floor
New York, NY 10018

Office: 646-649-9923
Cell: 415-990-6502
Email: libby@prh.org

Related Posts:

On the 43rd Anniversary of Roe v. Wade, Our Doctors #ReclaimRoe

Antonella LavelanetForty-three years ago, the Supreme Court legalized abortion in the United States in its landmark decision on Roe v. Wade. In the current political climate, there is reason to celebrate another year with legal abortion as the law of the land. But there is no doubt that millions of women cannot exercise this constitutional right without overcoming significant barriers.

Physicians for Reproductive Health is doing everything we can to #ReclaimRoe, making the promise of Roe v. Wade a reality for every single woman in America. As part of today's anniversary, we are pleased to feature a piece by current Leadership Training Academy fellow, Antonella Lavelanet, DO, JD.

Late in 2015, a United Nations Working Group traveled to the United States to assess the state of U.S. women’s human rights, including the ability to access comprehensive reproductive health care. As a self-proclaimed world leader devoted to medical and scientific advancement, one might expect that the U.S. leads the pack in terms of protecting the health of its citizens. And yet, what the UN group found instead were core failures to advance women’s standing in society. In its initial report, the group’s human rights experts pointed out that paid maternity leave is not universal in our country, that U.S. policy- and law-making bodies lack adequate representation of women and their needs, and that the full spectrum of reproductive health care services is not accessible to many women.

As an obstetrician/gynecologist specializing in family planning, these findings come as no surprise to me. Continue reading Dr. Lavelanet's piece >>

Testimony of Margaux Lazarin, DO, MPH, Before the New York City Council, October 27, 2015

“I am pleased to see the City Council taking steps to implement reporting and tracking systems to make sure that each student receives appropriate sexual health education. I am also here to thank the Council for the opportunity to discuss this topic and encourage the Council to go further to ensure quality sexuality education in New York.”

 

Our New Video: “Why I Provide”

This spring, we undertook the mission of adding a new chapter to our wildly popular publication, Why I Provide, which was originally published in 2004. For this update, we teamed up with producer/director Linda Porto to film five physicians in our network as they spoke about their lives, their careers, and their motivations: Dr. Jennifer Amico, Dr. Bhavik Kumar, Dr. Gillian Dean, Reproductive Health Advocacy Fellow Dr. Kathleen Morrell, and board member Dr. Willie Parker.

This five-minute video highlights why each of them considers it an honor and a privilege to be an abortion provider and continue this vital work, despite mounting restrictions and threats to their safety. We hope you enjoy watching it as much as we enjoyed making it.

 

Dr. Lonna Gordon: Happy Mother’s Day to Young Mothers Everywhere

Dr. Lonna GordonLonna Gordon, MD, PharmD, is a pediatrician who specializes in adolescent medicine at the Mt. Sinai Adolescent Health Center in New York City. She is a Leadership Training Academy fellow.

It is a bright spring day and I am headed to meet a friend at the park. A woman passing me on the street smiles at me and says, “Happy Mother’s Day!” I am not a mother, but after many Mother’s Days, as a “true adult” I have learned it is just easier to smile and offer a polite “Thank You” to well-wishers. Moreover, as a pediatrician who specializes in adolescent medicine I am a caretaker of hundreds of children, so perhaps I exude motherly qualities.

Later that week I see one of my patients, a young mother whom I will call Shannon, in my exam room and ask her how her Mother’s Day was.

“Ok,” she replies.

“Just ok?” I prod. “Did you do anything special?  Have a nice meal?  Get flowers or a card?”

“No,” she says with a sigh, “It was just another day.”

I change the subject, and soon we are discussing how to potty train her son and prepare him for the new baby expected in a few months. I check in on how many semesters she has left at the local community college and tell Shannon how proud I am that she is pursuing her educational goals. However, as I move through the rest of my day I can’t help but feel sad for her. How terrible it must feel as a mother to have no one acknowledge your hard work and accomplishments, especially on Mother’s Day!

In my practice at the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center in New York City, I work every day with a multidisciplinary team to provide vital, comprehensive adolescent health care that emphasizes confidentiality and support for whatever happens in our patients’ lives. We empower young people to make responsible choices concerning their reproductive health. While access to comprehensive sex education and contraception are absolutely important, this is only one part of the solution. When those approaches fail and one of my patients becomes pregnant, I support her no matter what she decides. If she makes the deeply personal choice to become a parent, I support her.

So while I provide the full range of contraceptive care, I also care for teenage parents and their children and I support them in their efforts to be excellent parents and raise healthy kids. At the Center, I am able to provide these services free of charge, and without judgment.

Our culture frequently sends the message to young parents that they are irresponsible and a burden to society. We tell them they are too young to parent, won’t be able to do it well, and that their lives and dreams are over when they have a child.  We marginalize and stigmatize them.

But what would happen if instead we—doctors, teachers, social workers, society—gave them support? We know that when young people are healthy in mind and body, they can make it in this world. What if we taught them good parenting skills? What if we encouraged their educational goals and dreams? What if we ensured they had secure housing, reliable child-care and nutritious food? What if we equipped them with the knowledge and resources for planning their next pregnancy?

Young mothers want the same things for their children that all mothers want. They want to do a good job. They work at balancing parenting with their many other personal responsibilities. They want their kids to be happy, healthy, and successful. They need to feel supported as they do their best in such a meaningful role.

As a doctor, I am in a privileged position. I get to see tangible results of what young mothers achieve when they are supported. They are happy and well adjusted. They finish high school. They go to college. They get jobs. Their kids are healthy and meet their developmental milestones. They learn how to co-parent with their child’s father or other extended family members.

A year has passed and Shannon is the mother of two and just three months away from finishing her associate’s degree. My hope for her this Mother’s Day is that she experiences a holiday where she is celebrated and validated. So to Shannon, and all the young moms reading this who may feel forgotten or undervalued: I believe in you and I wish you a Happy Mother’s Day!

Crossposted on Feministing